Levelling the Basement Floor with Levelrock

Many years ago, we applied to be on one of those home reno shows and they chose to renovate our basement! – or so we thought. In the planning stages of the reno, the show’s contractor discovered that the slope of our basement floor was too steep to build on. The floor was inconsistent and out of level by over half a foot in some areas! There wouldn’t be enough time in the production schedule to fix it properly so they were going to have to take a pass on us.

At first, we were disappointed: who wouldn’t want a crew to come in and take care of a major renovation while we sit back and let them do all the work? But on the flip side, as avid DIY’ers, it was going to be hard to give up full control of the project. In the end, it worked out in our favour because there’s no sense in finishing a basement when there’s still things to renovate on other levels of the house (i.e. our kitchen still needed to be renovated). You really need open access to the plumbing and electrical in the basement before closing those things off forever once the basement is done!

Anyway, since we had cleared our stuff out of the basement for the show, it seemed like a prime opportunity to level the basement floor and get it over with. Once that was done, we could take our own sweet time to renovate the basement ourselves when we were ready. But with 700 square feet of space in our basement, it wasn’t going to be something that we could tackle ourselves. We needed an expert.

After researching our options, we settled on a product called Levelrock and brought in a licensed contractor to apply it. Levelrock is a self-leveling gypsum underlayment that provides a smooth, crack-resistant surface that accepts virtually all types of floor coverings (it’s not to be used as a finished floor). It was a great solution for us for two reasons: we used the ‘green’ version of the product and it left the door open to a choice of many floor coverings before we finally settled on the engineered hardwood we eventually installed.

Before the actual levelling could take place, there were several things we had to do to prepare. The first order of business was moving our water heater. This wasn’t necessary with respect to the floor levelling per se, but the builder installed it in an area that was going to encroach on our finished laundry room. All that needed to be done was to shift it a few feet to tuck it in beside the furnace. Since we were renting it, we paid to have it moved.

Once the water heater was moved and the two appliances were side by side, It wasn’t really practical cost-wise to have them both raised to the level of the new floor so we did the next best thing by creating a ‘step down’. Hubs built a frame around what was going to be the furnace room to provide a barrier against the levelling compound.

Here it is from two more angles:

See that jog in the wood bracing by the water heater?

We eeked out every inch of space and turned that into a niche to showcase my collection of antique irons (show below), but I digress.

Back in the unfinished basement we had another dilemma: the water drain was in the furnace room and it was going to be closed off to the rest of the basement. What if we had a flood: how would the water drain?

We brought a plummer in to consult and he suggested trenching a new drain from the laundry room to the furnace room. But after we got a quote and he went away, we realized that we didn’t need to trench at all! Our solution? Since the pour was going to be deep, hubs installed some ABS pipe directly onto the concrete, through the wood bracing and lined up over the floor drain in the furnace room. Since it would be buried in the new underlayment anyway we didn’t see any reason to trench it.

Although it’s hard to tell, we angled the pipe on a downward slope toward the existing drain. We ensured that there was extra pipe above the level of the new floor so it could be cut even with our finished flooring later. Before the new floor was poured, we stuffed a rag into the opening. If you’re following our series on installing a floating hardwood floor, we’ll be showing you how we finished off the ‘new’ drain in the laundry area in an upcoming post.

Here’s an overview shot of the pipe leading up to the drain in the furnace room.

Hubs installed another wooden barrier in our cold storage room so he could move our upright freezer in there.

He then plugged the freezer into an outlet and temporarily sealed off around it with plastic. On the downside, the cold room floor didn’t get levelled, but at a least we didn’t have to lug the freezer up the basement stairs!

Speaking of the stairs, the part that rests on the floor got lifted onto blocks (on blue moisture proof wood). We couldn’t remove the stairs because we still needed a way to get up and down afterwards. Raising them on blocks made them functional and also allowed them to be removed at a future date for eventual replacement.

Unfortunately for us we had already done insulation and drywall around the perimeter of the basement. If you’re going to level a basement, I suggest you do it BEFORE completing any other work. All we could do was remove the bottom layer of drywall and seal the plastic moisture barrier well around the perimeter with tape and construction adhesive.

My only contribution before the levelling took place was adding graffiti on the floor below one of the posts. Even though it got buried, I still know it’s there 🙂

We’re Going to Level With You

On the day of the pour, the crew came in and marked all the high and low spots with blue spray paint.

Outside the house, their equipment monopolized our street for the better part of the day. It’s always a good idea to get a street permit so the neighbours can’t complain.

Countless bags of Levelrock went into the hopper to be mixed with water and pumped into our house through a hose positioned in our basement window.

On the inside, the level rock was pumped in starting in the far corner of the basement (in the laundry room).

A long float was used to spread the material out. You can see how our new drain pipe is sticking out above the new floor level.

Here you can see the Levelrock flowing around the barrier hubs put up around the furnace room.

They gradually moved toward the stairs, levelling with the float as they went….

… and adding more as needed.

Levelrock can take about 2 to 3 weeks to dry depending on drying conditions and also the depth of the pour. A dehumidifier can help speed up the drying process, so 3 hours after the crew was done pouring (when it could handle foot traffic), we plugged in our dehumidifier and left it running while the floor dried. Levelrock should be completely dry before placing any furniture on it; we let ours dry for about 2 months before our ‘stuff’ started to trickle back into our basement.

Levelrock can be used for more than just basement applications. For anyone wanting to use it on an upper level, the product can be used over a wood subfloor, but should be poured at a minimum thickness of 3/4 inch. It can be a saving grace when you run into noticeable variances in level and want a cohesive subfloor before applying a new flooring finish.

Unfortunately we never did get pictures of our completely empty basement with our newly levelled floor because our camera broke. By the time we got a new camera, we had moved some of our stuff back in.

Once the floor was dry, hubs removed all the wood bracing around the water heater/furnace area. Below, you can see the step down and also the new drain.

Moving the two appliances side-by-side allowed us to extend the wall to separate the laundry area from the furnace room.

Here’s the view looking back from our staircase. The floor is perfectly smooth and the basement is ready to put up walls.

We could finally start planning our reno!

Before we started building, hubs added caution tape around the perimeter of the step down.

Then he was off to the races with the walls and rough-ins.

Thanks to a lazy builder, we were not only robbed of an opportunity to have our basement renovated on HGTV but the unseen costs that went into our basement reno added up to quite a chunk of change! Looking back however, we’re happy with the outcome. I had fun planning the layout and we learned so much during the build, like how to tile a backsplash, do our own electrical (with a permit of course) and use ready-made Ikea Pax units to add storage in the craft studio.

Basement Plan (mancave not shown)

Our basement reno is an accomplishment we’re proud of and it all started with a consistent foundation:) In the end, we built a laundry room, a mancave and a craft room from the (level!) ground up – all custom designed by us to suit our needs.

If you’re following our flooring series, we have two more posts coming up soon: how to prep for installing floating engineered hardwood and finally, the actual how-to install.

You can follow Birdz of a Feather right here (link in the footer) or via Bloglovin’ (click the button below). You can also follow us on Pinterest and on our Youtube channel.

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Fire Pit Upcycle

Last summer, I made it my mission to create and craft using nothing but items I found on garbage day within a few block perimeter of my house. Unfortunately my mission was prematurely cut short after my craft studio sprang a leak and I no longer had a place to work and store my finds 🙁 I did however, score a few great things before becoming water logged and having to put my projects on hold!
It’s amazing what you can find kicked to the curb every week. It breaks my heart to see the abundance of waste that goes to landfill when there’s much that can be done to breathe a second life in it! As I walked down the street on this particular day, I spotting something in the distance.

As I got near, I saw it was an old rusted fire pit.

The mesh top was destroyed and had separated from the strapping. The rust on the surrounding metal was deeply pocked and beyond saving.

Most people would have kept on going. But not me. As I lifted off the top to explore, I  noticed that the base was quite ornate and not nearly as rusted as the top. When you think about it, it makes sense that the bowl would be destroyed far sooner than the base because it’s more exposed to the elements. I was inspired!

I grabbed the base and lugged it home, leaving the rest behind for garbage pickup.

Just a few weeks earlier, I picked up a special item at our favourite outdoor antique market (Aberfoyle) and knew right away that the two would pair perfectly. Ironically, when hubs first saw the base, he had the same idea so I knew I was on the right track to transform this piece!

We started by sanding away all the loose rust, then spraying it with a few thin coats of rust paint to prevent further rusting in a bold, bright red. Once dry, we followed with a few coats of clear to protect it.

The colour really made the design pop, as you’ll see fully in the reveal!

We then gathered some rubber bumpers and screws.

The design of these bumpers would allow the screw heads to be countersunk so they don’t stick out beyond the bumper (more on where they were applied later).

Now for the final piece. Here’s the beauty we found at the Aberfoyle Antique Market. It’s an old stainless steel milk can:

With the milkcan’s lid missing, I always intended to turn it into a planter for our back garden, but it never occurred to me to put the two pieces together until one day we turned the fire pit upside down and realized it would provide the perfect base to showcase it! Looking back on this picture, I must have gotten the idea to paint the base red when it was near our front door!

After nailing down the plan, we found a plastic pot with drainage to fit the opening of the milk can and planted wave petunias in it:

Hubs completed the base by drilling holes evenly spaced around the top edge.

He then screwed the bumpers in place.

He took the base outside to pair up with the milk can.

Once planted with wave petunias, we put the milk can on top of the now upside down base. Here is the reveal in its intended garden setting:

We moved it to a few different spots in our small backyard oasis and settled on leaving it between a pair of chairs in front of the pond:

Here’s how it looked after growing for a while. The petunias just kept blooming all summer long 🙂

I wonder what the previous owners would think of their fire pit now! I think my mission was a resounding success. After seeing the transformation, would you think twice about throwing yours away?

If you enjoyed this post, please pin and share.

I can’t wait to pick up where I left off this summer with my curbside finds! In the meantime, here’s a retrospective of some of the best upcycled projects in the Craft Rehab section of our site:

SwingOut Catchall:

Soda Bottle Vertical Garden:

Blue Jean Planter:

Tarnish Free Jewellery Cabinet Upcycle:

You can follow Birdz of a Feather right here (link in the footer) or via Bloglovin’ (click the button below). You can also follow us on Pinterest and on our Youtube channel.

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Stained Glass Wall Art for the Bedroom

When you think of wall art for the bedroom, stained glass probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind, but I think incorporating a piece of stained glass can make a stunning addition to any bedroom decor!

I’ve always had a fascination with stained glass and longed to own a piece, but the time and expertise that goes into creating these beautiful works of art unfortunately priced it right out of my budget when I young. After purchasing my first house, I was house rich but cash poor so when I discovered a beginner’s stained glass course at my local community centre, I jumped at the chance to learn the art. Several years later I continued taking courses at a stained glass studio, when I moved to a new neighbourhood, where I dabbled with glass mosaic:

I hung this one in my spare bedroom.

Once I had the itch, I also tried fused glass…

and sandblasting…

After dating my husband for about 6 months, I felt compelled to create something extra special out of glass for his birthday. I was at the point in my learning where I was just starting to experiment with mixed media techniques (3D, fusing, sandblasting, lead and came) so I knew I would challenge myself.

I decided the theme would be Volkswagen because hubs had spent years restoring his cherished ’66 VW bug (a picture of which we later turned into a unique storage piece for my craft studio). I searched the net for inspiration and found some clipart that got the wheels turning – pun intended :).

For the stoplight, I cut pieces from hand rolled yellow art glass and melted the wing pieces in the kiln to soften the edges. For the centre, I sandblasted lines (filing them in with a permanent marker) then glued on faceted glass for the red, amber and green signals.

When I found some incredible glass that looked like chrome, I knew I had to use it for the bumpers on the VW bug. That piece was cut, stacked and fused together in one piece, then glued in place.

A VW art piece wouldn’t be complete without the VW logo so I sandblasted that onto a round piece of bevelled glass.

Just off-centre, I used a piece of grey mirror backed glass (similar to the one I used on our powder room cabinet doors) that I sandblasted VW ’66 into, the year of hubs’ car. I then drilled a hole through the glass with a special water-cooled glass grinder and inserted a clock mechanism (might as well have form and function!).

The final touches were to fuse glass keys and a VW fob for a keychain and add a road’ for the VW to drive on, created by sandblasting stripes in the centre of a piece of black glass.

It turned out to be so much work that I completely missed the deadline for hubs’ birthday! I scrambled to get it done for Christmas a few months later and gave it to him at his parent’s house on Christmas morning.

He loved it! I guess he loved me too because two months later we were engaged. I thought the way to a man’s heart was through his stomach, but apparently one-of-a-kind glass clocks work too 🙂

Once we were married, the VW stained glass clock went right onto one of the walls in our master bedroom.

It provides a nice splash of colour that can be seen as you enter the room.

Here’s a final closeup of the piece hung on the wall:

Stained glass is one of my favourite creative outlets so if you’re looking to take up a new and exciting hobby, I highly recommend it. You can probably find a community course or stained glass studio right in your own city (if you happen to live in the Toronto area, I highly recommend ‘Glasstronomy Studios‘. They have incredible workshops ranging from beginner to advanced and you can even commission a piece if you’re not inclined to learn stained glass for yourself 🙂

Source: Glasstronomy Studios

If you enjoyed this post, please pin and share.

You can follow Birdz of a Feather right here (link in the footer) or via Bloglovin’ (click the button below). You can also follow us on Pinterest and on our Youtube channel.

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This Is How We Roll Thursday Party

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How to Install Engineered Wood in the Basement – Shopping Tips (Pt. 1)

If you’re thinking about installing flooring, whether it’s below grade or above, an engineered wood floating floor is the way to go – especially if you’re planning on installing it over a concrete slab. Nothing adds beauty and warmth to a home like hardwood. In this first of our series on how we installed engineered hardwood flooring in our basement (a part of our broader Homeowner DIY Series for 2018), we’re exploring how to shop for it first. We wondered if engineered hardwood would be as good as solid wood and were surprised to learn that neither one is better. Only by weighing the pros and cons of each can you determine which one is a better fit for your own situation.

If you’re not really sure about the differences between engineered and solid flooring, engineered wood is produced with three to five layers of plywood topped by a wear layer of real wood. The wear layer can range in thickness; thicker layers can be re-sanded just like a traditional solid floor. Each layer is stacked in a cross-grain configuration and bonded together under heat and pressure to make it dimensionally stable. As a result, engineered wood flooring is less likely to be affected by changes in humidity and can be installed at all levels of the home. As far as installation is concerned, there are far more methods to choose from with an engineered product: you can staple, nail, click or glue.

Fusion Flooring Classical Elegance Oak Baroque / Dimensions: 9/16″ h x 7 1/2″ w

The picture above shows a cross section of the engineered hardwood flooring we ultimately chose for our basement. It’s a rustic-looking wire brushed fumed oak which gets its colour naturally from the smoking process (there’s no stain or dye-lots).

Fuzion Floors Oak Baroque

Solid wood on the other hand is milled from a single piece of wood (notice that you can see the ring formations of the tree on the cut edge below). Because of its thickness, a solid hardwood floor can be sanded and refinished many times over generations of use (the wear layer is typically around 1/4″ thick). Solid wood flooring expands and contracts with changes in your home’s relative humidity but doesn’t stand up well to moisture. It can be nailed or stapled.

If you plan to install over concrete, which is prone to dampness, solid wood isn’t an option: you must use an engineered product to ensure structural integrity. It’s less likely to warp or flex than solid wood if it comes into contact with moisture. For us, engineered hardwood was the perfect choice for our below grade application: it has the look of wood (because of the real wood top layer) but it’s especially practical for basements because it can hold up to some moisture exposure. You can increase it’s durability even more by installing an underlayment as a moisture barrier too. Here’s the one we used (more about it later):

DMX 1-Step Moisture Barrier Underlayment

Before You Shop

Before you shop, you need to make some decisions. There is so much more to consider than just how much you want to spend (although budget is, of course, a big consideration). What else is important to you? Do you want to purchase a sustainable product? What about health standards: do you want something that is manufactured without solvents, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) or formaldehyde and meets the strictest health standards? Off-gasing can be toxic and when you consider the totality of square footage of these materials in your home, it’s something you should give serious thought to – especially if you have young kids.

What about the look: wide planks or narrow? Dark or light? Rustic or smooth? Those are decisions you can think about then narrow down once you are out shopping.

Determine Layout and Square Footage

Start with a blank layout, then add the dimensions for each room so you can calculate the square footage. If there are lots of jogs in the floorpan (like our basement example below), break it down into manageable rectangular areas, multiply the length and width of each and add them all up to get the total square footage. Our total square footage came to 794 square feet, as shown in our floor plan.

After calculating square footage, don’t forget to factor in an additional 10% for waste (or more if you are laying on the diagonal or in a herringbone pattern) to determine how much you need in total. Most flooring has a dye-lot so if you run out and have to buy more, the difference in colour can be noticeable. Additionally, if you run short and the floor is suddenly discontinued you’ll be completely out of luck!

To calculate square footage, multiply length x width

We ended up purchasing a total of 875 square feet of flooring for our basement. It’s good to know your measurements before you go shopping because a higher quantity can affect the final price. For instance, buying for an entire level could qualify you for a lower per-square foot price vs. only one room. Knowing this before-hand will help you accurately calculate your final spend and keep you on budget. Alternately, if you were planning on staging your renovation and doing different rooms with different flooring over time, you might want to consider using a consistent floor and buying it all at once to save money.

Splines

The next thing you have to think about is the flow of the flooring. Are you installing hardwood in just one room or an entire level? If the flooring is going into multiple rooms and you are laying it yourself (like we did), you’ll likely need to purchase one or several splines. A spline can help you change direction as flooring moves through doorways from one room to another.

As you can see on our blank plan below, the red line represents where we will need to insert a spline so we can change direction. We ended up making our own spline, but they should also be available where you get your flooring so know how much you’ll need to purchase. I’ll explain more about splines in my next post (Part 2) on installing engineered hardwood.

Shopping for flooring can be daunting. Here are our shopping tips for finding your floor and getting it for the best price.

Shopping Tips

  1. Start early. It could take weeks before you decide what to purchase so give yourself enough lead time so you have it when you need it. This is especially important if you’re working with a contractor (time is money!). Most wood is already kiln dried, so it may not be necessary to let the wood sit in your home to acclimate before it’s installed. However, check to see what the manufacturer recommends: I would still plan to leave the wood in your home for 48-36 hours before installing if you can, so factor that time into the schedule.
  2. Map out flooring stores in your immediate area (yes on a map!) and make a list. You will cut down on gas and the time it takes to drive around in circles by mapping out your plan of attack first. Browse stores as time allows to determine what you like and don’t like. Check off the ones you’ve been to and only expand your search area if you can’t find what you want. Believe me when I tell you that being organized and knowing where you’ve already looked will help keep you sane 🙂
  3. In addition to your layout/square footage calculation, if you have a story board, take it with you. At the very least, make sure all your paint colours and other finishes are already selected before you start shopping (you can throw paint chips and pictures of items, such as cabinets, into a folder so you have an idea of what colours will work with your decor. It will help you rule out some of the choices once you hit the stores.
  4. Take a camera with you (or phone) so you can photograph flooring samples. Pictures are a great way to remember what you saw and be able to find it again once you’re ready to narrow down the choices. Don’t forget to take close-up pictures of the labels  on each sample board too if there’s something that catches your eye. You won’t remember what it was just from a picture of the wood alone!
  5. Ask questions! Sales people are there to help. When I was a hardwood newbie, I didn’t realize that certain types of wood are harder wearing than others (i.e. a hardwood such as Oak is more durable than a softer wood such as Pine). With further research, I discovered that woods are rated by the Janka hardness test which measures the resistance of a sample of wood to denting and wear. The standard hardness for a traditional hardwood floor, such as Red Oak, is 1290. Exotic species such as Brazilian Walnut are 3684. Here is one example of a Janka scale chart you can use to compare different woods:
  6. Know what you’re getting! Flooring always looks wonderful on the sample board but what are you actually getting in the box? Some manufacturers have a good selection of varying lengths, while others have nothing but short boards which might ruin the look you’re going for. Consider asking to buy or sign out a few actual floor boards too so you can lay them out on-site. As you can see below, you can’t get a good idea of the plank lengths just from the sample boards (which are all a consistent size within each store for display purposes). If you’re lucky, the floor you like will be laid out in the showroom so you can visualize it. Withstanding that, you need to see the actual length of the wood planks.
    The flooring we purchased had four different lengths, the largest of which was 73″. We loved the overall look of the proportions. In almost the same view of my craft studio shown above, below you can see how the various lengths are staggered in the finished space.
    Here’s an illustration of the dos and don’ts of staggering the joints. You never want ends to line up side by side.
  7. Select the colour. Some collections have an overwhelming number of colour choices making it hard to narrow them down in the showroom. Once you settle on brand and type of wood, sign out sample boards and take them home to see which colour looks best (if you didn’t already cover that off in #6). You may have to put a returnable deposit on them, but it’s well worth it as long as you don’t forget to return them on time! Seeing samples in your home will help you determine how the floor will look in the setting once it’s installed. As you can see in the first picture, there isn’t enough light and there are no finishes in this room to compare against.
    This next picture is better: we moved the samples into the laundry room and added additional lighting so we can now compare the floor against some of the actual finishes in our space.It might even be helpful to hold samples right up to your cabinets. The one shown below was eliminated this way.
    The picture below shows our finished laundry room/craft studio. The engineered hardwood we chose looks great against the other finishes; it’s neutral enough to work with everything.
  8. Consider an underlay. An underlay can act to limit noise tranfer and provide optimal water resistance. In condos, there are even regulations that require you to install an underlayment for noise abatement. Know what your particular regulations are. A dimpled membrane, such as DMX 1-Step, deadens noise, is a great choice over concrete or subfloors, and makes the floor warmer with the all important peace of mind of moisture and mold protection (it’s waterproof on both sides). All you have to do is roll it out leaving a quarter-inch gap between the wall, tape the seams and cut around obstructions. As you’ll see in Part 2, it’s easy peasy! If you are a regular reader, you’ll know that our underlayment was put to the test when we had a water leak in my craft room right after finishing our basement. It passed with flying colours and we would highly recommend it (and no, we don’t get anything to say that).
  9. Be wary of too good to be true pricing. When stores offer super cheap prices, the product is probably a second. There will likely be flaws in the boxed product, vs. the beautiful sample you see in the showroom, that you can’t live with. Again, be sure you find out what you’re actually getting before it’s too late. Where flooring is concerned, you really do get what you pay for.
  10. Comparison Shop!! Once you’ve made your selection, go online to search for the website of the brand you’ve chosen to see what other stores distribute it. Once you find out all the distributors, make a list of each store in your City, then call each one to compare pricing. Some won’t give pricing over the phone so you may have to visit in person. By doing this, we found drastic fluctuations in price and were able to save hundreds of dollars on our final purchase. Don’t forget to also ask about the price of delivery and factor that in too – it all adds up! We paid $130 to have the boxes delivered right to our basement. Some companies won’t bring the delivery further than just past the front door so it was worth every penny to us for the convenience of not having to lug the boxes down the stairs ourselves.
  11. Look on Craigslist. You never know what you’ll find! A friend of ours purchased a whole house-worth of high-quality flooring and then changed his mind about installing all of it. He had to drastically cut the price to get rid of the portion he decided not to use. Someone’s loss could be your gain.
  12. Purchase/Rent Accessories. Once you’ve settled on your engineered hardwood floor, you might think your shopping is done, but it’s not! If your subfloor needs repair or replacement, put tongue and groove plywood on the shopping list. For above grade installation you can rent a pneumatic nailer and buy nails to suit the thickness of the flooring (however if you found an engineered hardwood with a ‘click’ floor system that is designed to lock into place, you won’t need additional fasteners or adhesive).If you’re installing in the basement however, as we did, we suggest floating the floor by gluing the tongue and groove together along the seams (not to be confused with glue you use to completely adhere the planks down to the floor). The glue we used is shown below. Purchase an adhesive that’s specifically designed for the installation of engineered floors over cured concrete; it should be moisture resistant and easy to clean from the surface of the wood if you get drips. We don’t suggest buying this type of glue in bulk. The applicator bottle makes quick work of applying it to the seams (and there’s no chance of spilling it while trying to transfer it from the bulk container to an applicator!).To work in conjunction with the glue, we used 3M painters tape to hold the planks in place as they dried.
    The next accessory is a ‘must have’. Buy a thick memory foam kneeling pad, like the one shown below. It’s far better than knee pads! Hubs has tried just about every knee pad on the market and can’t stand the straps; they are painful and restrictive to use.Lastly, buy an installation kit, as shown below. Lucky for us, we were able to borrow one from our brother-in-law. The tapping block (bottom) will keep the wood from getting damaged when it’s struck with a rubber mallet (which you’ll need too). The pull bar allows you pull planks together in tight areas – such as installing the last plank up against the wall. Although it’s made for laminate, it works perfectly for engineered hardwood as well. The kit also comes with spacers, but we made our own out of MDF (as you’ll see in Part 2).

Here’s another view of what our flooring looks like installed above ground – from the manufacturer’s brochure. The natural light and expansive space makes it look even more beautiful! Stay tuned for the DIY tutorial on how we installed it as a floating floor in our basement.

Source: Fuzion Flooring Baroque Oak

If you enjoyed this post, please pin and share.

In the meantime, if you’re curious to see more examples of how the flooring turned out in our finished basement, check out the reveals of the mancave, craft studio and laundry room.

If you’re an avid DIY’er, like we are, you’ll want to follow the Homeowner DIY Series we launched this year.  Along with the second part of this post (How to Install an Engineered Floating Floor), we’ll be giving you tips on water leak prevention, getting a professional look for mudding drywall (how to achieve a level 5 drywall finish!), installing baseboards and finishing a basement.

In case you missed it, check out our post on installing a frost proof faucet.

You can follow Birdz of a Feather right here (link in the footer) or via Bloglovin’ (click the button below). You can also follow us on Pinterest and on our Youtube channel.

Oh My Goth (Part 2) - Make a Halloween Tombstone | Birdz of a FeatherOh My Goth (Part 2) - Make a Halloween Tombstone | Birdz of a FeatherThis Is How We Roll Thursday Party

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